10-Mar-2019 (Sun)
Wherein it's nearly The Night of the Living Techbros

Today is DNA Pizza's 8th anniversary! Hooray!

We still haven't found a restaurant manager! Boo!

Everything old is new again: it will be the 20th anniversary of the release of The Matrix in a couple of weeks -- yes, there is no way that this news does not make you feel old -- and we're doing a screening of the movie here, followed by a Matrix-themed rave! Next Friday, March 22. It should be pretty great, in a Cyberdelia sort of way. No skate ramps this time, though. Oh, speaking of, if you go hit "like" on the Cyberdelia facebook page, you may find yourself a discount code.

And since we're partying like it's 1999, here's a bleak, dystopian future from noted science fiction magazine The New York Times:

Thousands of New Millionaires Are About to Eat San Francisco Alive:

Big wealth doesn't come in monthly paychecks. It comes when a start-up goes public, transforming hypothetical money into extremely real money. This year -- with Uber, Lyft, Slack, Postmates, Pinterest and Airbnb all hoping to enter the public markets -- there's going to be a lot of it in the Bay Area. [...] Welcomed finally into the elite caste who can afford to live comfortably in the Bay Area, the fleet of new millionaires are already itching to claim what has been promised all these years. [...]

"Are we going to see a one-bedroom condo that's worth less than $1 million in five years?" he asked the crowd. "Are we going to see single family homes selling for one to three million?" [...]

When Google in Mountain View and Facebook in Menlo Park went public, their workers were spread across the Bay Area, and so the impact on housing was diffuse. Now, many of the biggest start-ups are based in San Francisco, in part thanks to the city's tax breaks. Brokers say San Francisco is where the workers want to stay. [...]

"We see multiple parties per I.P.O. for the company that is I.P.O.ing, as well as firms that are associated to them," Mr. Siegan said. Budgets for start-up parties, he said, can easily go above $10 million. "They're wanting to bring in A-list celebrities to perform at the dinner tables for the executives. They want ballet performers."

A popular new feature he's noticing is clients hoping to curate their own theme concerts featuring fleets of bands. Mr. Siegan says he put on one for a 1980s loving tech executive, featuring the B-52s, Devo, The Bangles, Tears for Fears and Flock of Seagulls.

In a warehouse in Concord, Calif., the I.P.O. ice sculptor is getting ready to staff up for what he says will be a long year.

If any of you reading this work for a company planning to throw one of these massive IPO shindigs, let me emphasize that we are ready and willing to (gunshot, gunshot, click, cash register) take your money. Operators are standing by.

It's the least you could do. Like, it is literally, literally the least. No least-er.

As always, The Onion was there first:

Report: Nation's Gentrified Neighborhoods Threatened By Aristocratization:

WASHINGTON -- According to a report released Tuesday by the Brookings Institution, a Washington-based think tank, the recent influx of exceedingly affluent powder-wigged aristocrats into the nation's gentrified urban areas is pushing out young white professionals, some of whom have lived in these neighborhoods for as many as seven years.

Maureen Kennedy, a housing policy expert and lead author of the report, said that the enormous treasure-based wealth of the aristocracy makes it impossible for those living on modest trust funds to hold onto their co-ops and converted factory loft spaces. [...]

"These accusations are pure, slanderous rubbish," said Lord Nathan Dunkirk III, the owner of a prodigious manor house that, along with its steeplechase course and topiary garden, sits on what was once the Haight-Ashbury district of San Francisco. "If anything, the layabouts and wastrels have been afforded a veritable glut of new and felicitous opportunities as bootblacks and scullery maids."

3 Responses:

  1. 205guy says:

    As a 40-something myself, I'm noticing a lot of 80's nostalgia hitting ring now, almost as bad as the boomers back in the 90's (heh). In any case, is it possible for you to tap into this with groups from that time that might still be playing? You mention Flock of seagulls, so what about Psychadelic Furs, OMD, Crowded House, Cutting Crew, The Dylans, Michael Penn, House of Love, The Church, and on and on (basically he good tracks from a John Hughes movie soundtrack). And I didn't even get to the 90's alternative bands from Seattle. As you can guess, I know zero about the business (sorry), whether these bands are even still playing (though I was surprised at the Bangles), and whether they play in places like DNA Lounge. But I would love to see OMD and House of Love.

    • jwz says:

      Sure, we pretty regularly host “greatest hits” tours along the lines of what you’re thinking. We recently had Book of Love, and both versions of Gene Loves Jezebel, for just a couple of examples. A venue of our size often gets a band at both ends of their curve: before the stadium tours, and then after the stadium tours. It’s a thing.

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